Trees and Sky

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When the goal is to get better, deliberate practice is the strategy to use. Deliberate practice works because it makes the difficult familiar and, therefore, easier to do. Deliberate practice involves repetition and having a coach or mentor who can help guide the practice and offer constructive critiques.

What I learned about painting a tree and sky holes

I thought it might be easier to paint the sky behind the tree (known as sky holes) first and then paint the tree over the sky. Painting sky holes isn’t hard to do, but I reasoned—wrongly—that painting them first would save me time. A good teacher or mentor could have helped me understand why my experiment failed, but studying how other painters work and what they have to say about things like sky holes is a good alternative.

I’m reading Carlson’s Guide to Landscape Painting by John F. Carlson. In the chapter on Light, Carlson explains that light loses brilliance when it’s filtered through a dark mass (thick leaves). But that isn’t the “whole” story. Carlson goes on to explain that the sky color varies in value according to the size and consequent amount of light that’s admitted through them. The lightest holes are the biggest holes. The small holes are darker. I’ll apply Carlson’s suggestions on my my next painting.

What do you want to do better? How can you accomplish your goal?

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